Come to the Georgia National Fair for the Ultimate Southern Experience

Fall rolls around in Georgia, not necessarily because the temperatures have dropped, but because every other billboard says the Georgia National Fair has arrived to Perry, Georgia. Usually the second and third weeks of October is something that every middle Georgian looks forward to. It’s not a question of if they’re going to the fair, but when and how many times. The fair is literally a part off middle Georgia culture. Friends meet at the clock tower, watch incredibly talented performers, ride rides, and eat the greasiest, most delicious food in the world. Some make a game plan, checking show times online to see all the entertainment available. Others go for the rides, buying an armband and screaming their heart out on the beautifully lit roller coasters. This fair is different than any other. I’ve met people from all over the country coming to enjoy this incredible week-long experience. The Georgia National Fair is a one stop shop to experience Georgia culture, Southern charm, and entertainment of every kind.

@jessicamaephotography

Scarecrows of famous characters line the front of a large building that’s filled with locally crafted art created by all ages. From photography and paintings to handmade quilts, these masterpieces depict the very essence of Georgia culture. A photo of an FFA (Future Farmers of America) high schooler spending quality time with his award winning cow warms the heart of everyone who stops to look. Paintings of woodlands with every creature imaginable depict what Georgians value most about their home. It’s eye-opening to discover how much talent is in our neck of the woods.

Jessica Mae Photography
Jessica Mae Photography

Something that’s also pretty cool to experience is Georgia’s emphasis on agriculture, especially at the fairgrounds. An entire warehouse is dedicated to selling, sampling, and promoting locally grown produce and locally raised cattle. This warehouse, called the Georgia Grown building, has honey, barbecue sauce, roasted pecans, and many other delicious treats grown right in our hometown. Free recipe books are handed out to let the public know all that they can cook with Georgia’s farm-fresh food. One of the best desserts available at the Georgia National Fair is, of course, the piping hot peach cobbler with melting vanilla ice cream on top.

2Edit(1of69)
Jessica Mae Photography

“Thank you, ma’am.” “Howdy, sir.” Georgia is still a place where everyone is expected to address someone older with the utmost respect. While we may only be joking when using the word, “howdy,” listen closely and you’ll hear the southern slang that makes Georgia so intriguing. Another taste of Southern living can be found in our music happening daily at the fair. The wonderful performers, mostly singing country music, get people up and dancing in their boots. Many emerging artists come and show off their newly discovered talent every night while a major music star will have a large concert the Friday before the fair leaves town. My first concert ever was at the Georgia National Fair when the Jonas Brothers came to town (still sad they are no longer a band.) This year, people flooded the fair grounds to see the talented Trace Adkins rock the stage.

@jessicamaephotography

So plan a trip to see the Georgia National Fair in Perry, Georgia this year. Mark your calendar for mid to late October and enjoy some sugar roasted pecans, boot-stomping rhythms, and a good Southern time. Stay until 10:00 pm to end the perfect day with fireworks over the lake. See this nostalgic, beloved place light up one last time before it turns in for the night and rests for the next day.

Jessica Mae Photography
Jessica Mae Photography

Where to stay:

There are many Airbnbs around Perry, Georgia, which is usually the first website that I check for stays. If you find one you like, here is my link to get $40 off your first Airbnb: Katie’s Airbnb Discount
However, we do have several hotels in Perry like Comfort Inn and Suites, Best Western, and Microtel Inn & Suites by Wyndham Perry that will be perfect for spending a few days at the fair. Although there are several Perry hotels with 4+ stars on Google, if they are booked, check out the nearby town of Warner Robins. Stay on Watson Boulevard near the interstate for quick access to I-75 and you’ll get to the fairgrounds in about 25-30 minutes.

Other sites around Perry, Georgia:

Perry’s town square is worth stopping by during your stay. With cute boutiques, pottery painting, and 2 Jerks Soda for dessert, downtown Perry makes for a fun little town to experience. I also recommend a trip to the Oil Lamp, which is highly popular with the locals, for some delicious country-style dinner.

Addresses:

Georgia National Fairgrounds and Agricenter
401 Golden Isles Pkwy, Perry, GA 31069
Oil Lamp
401 General Courtney Hodges Blvd, Perry, GA 31069
Peach Palette Pottery
907 Carroll St, Perry, GA 31069

D.C. in a Day: Walking Guide & Lessons Learned

This past Spring Break, I took advantage of my precious time off from class and hit the road. My family, boyfriend, and I drove to the Historic Triangle in Virginia, consisting of Williamsburg, Yorktown, and Jamestown. The most fascinating stories of the first British colonies and the Revolutionary War were told to us by historians at each site. It was interesting to listen to the stories unfold and imagine how they lived during the 1800s. After exploring the primary towns responsible for the formation of America, we decided to do the fully American thing, and drove about 2.5 hours north to Washington D.C.

This post is a compilation of mistakes we made in D.C. as well as some things we really enjoyed. I’ll list the most useful ways of getting around and my favorite parts of our capital. Here’s the map of the walking route we took, which I think covered most of the historic landmarks.

We did not make it to the changing of the guards at the Tomb of the Lost Soldier this trip, but that is definitely worth attending.

The Big Mistake:

The entire day before and even on our way to D.C., we were debating whether to search for a parking spot in D.C. or park at a metro nearby and take it into town. On the way there, I read a blog that recommended the metro so we got off at the next exit, parked our car, and took the metro. HUGE mistake!!!!!! Only one metro was working so they combined the yellow and blue line into one route. We spent about an hour and a half just trying to go what would have taken us 15 minutes by car. I recommend taking the risk of driving into D.C. and finding a parking spot. If you can’t find a metered spot, which can now be paid by credit card and phone, pay $24 for a whole day at the Union Station parking garage. Once there, you can buy a metro card for the buses. Plus, if you do want to tour Georgetown or the cute neighborhoods nearby, you can just go pick up your car and drive there.

The Holocaust Museum:

Our first stop was to the Holocaust Museum because we reserved a slot online the day before for 1pm. If you have a reservation, you avoid the long line that goes all the way out the door. We scooted on by and showed the front desk our tickets that we printed at our hotel and they let us right through. This tour took us about 2 hours, but you could spend so much longer if you weren’t on a time crunch. It is heart wrenching as you walk through each level and experience the lives of the Jewish people who begin as normal citizens and eventually have everything stripped away from them. For children, the first floor has a walk-through story about a Jewish child whose life is turned upside down by the Nazis. Although still very real and very sad, this portion of the museum is less graphic.

Air and Space Museum:

Even though I had toured D.C. before, this was my boyfriend’s first time ever. I wanted him to get the most out of the small amount of time we had in this incredible place. Growing up, he wanted to be an astronaut and then a military pilot, so we chose to tour the Air and Space Museum as it was 3 pm and we could only choose one Smithsonian before they closed. Once again, in every museum you can spend 30 minutes to 5 hours there, depending on how interested you are in the subject matter.

20170308_141714

The United States Capitol:

This is one of my favorite buildings for two reasons: 1.) The architecture and paintings inside are mind-blowing, and 2.) They give tours. I love tours because when stories are told by historians and tour guides who really love the topic, I get really into it and love their enthusiasm. We had a recent grad student lead our tour group who was an excellent speaker, knew his stuff, and even threw in trivia questions for fun. After the tour, we walked to the Library of Congress. It was closed, but we were still able to walk up the steps and admire just how amazing this building really was. I mean, even the door was made of three-foot thick solid wood!

20170308_140025

Dinner at Union Station:

Union Station should be on your list for sight-seeing even if you aren’t taking a train ride or even eating. It is simply beautiful. It’s ceilings reach all-time highs and it doesn’t disappoint when compared to the rest of the architecture in D.C. We ate at the Shake Shack, which serves overpriced burgers and fries. I would probably recommend choosing something else in the food court like Chinese food or Charley’s Philly Cheese Steaks.

20170308_181011

D.C. at Nighttime:

Go see the monuments at night! Lincoln looks even more gigantic then he already is and the White House is beautifully lit for pictures. We walked from the Lincoln Memorial to the Vietnam and Korean War memorials and then to the WWII Memorial. They were all so much more breathtaking when every name on the wall of fallen soldiers was lit up in honor.

44103

Transportation Options:

While clearly I had a bad experience with taking the metro into town, others have had great luck. The parking is free, and the metro card is only about $5 each. If you do decide to use it, hopefully both metro routes will be working properly. If you choose to park in the heart of D.C., go for the Union station parking lot. As far as once you’re in the city, you walk and walk some more! The buses will take you to certain landmarks, but we just walked everywhere. As long as you make a giant loop around the city, it’s not a bad walk especially when the weather is nice. If you have more time to spend, take a car to see the outskirts. I’ve read of the amazing eats and cute neighborhoods that I will definitely go see on my next trip there. I live about 9 hours from D.C. so I’ve never flown in except on a field trip with a tour bus. I think renting a car would be helpful if spending a week in D.C. as you will want to see more outside the district.

Places to Stay:

Option #1 (cheapest):

In the city, places to stay will be pricey. I just looked it up on Booking.com and found several hostels available if you are looking to meet new people. Some hostels even serve breakfast. A 3 night stay was around $150.

Option #2 (Priciest):

Hotels on the outskirts of D.C. near Arlington Cemetery, like Motel 6, are still $100/ night. However, you are paying for convenience if you choose a centralized hotel, which could be well-worth the cost if you are only staying for a few nights.

Option #3 (in between):

For families or groups of 4 or more, there is no beating Airbnb.com. More space for less money allows you to cook your meals, or at least your breakfast, and fit more people into one house or apartment instead of in multiple hotel rooms. I just looked and found several Airbnb stays for around $100/ night in neighborhoods close to the White House or Capitol Hill.

Here is my link for $40 off your first booking with Airbnb: Katie’s $40 Airbnb Discount

I hope these tips are helpful in planning your next trip to the capital of the United States of America!

Lovely Travels,

Katie

If you’d like to support my blog, use this link to search for and buy anything you need from Amazon.com: Katie’s Amazon link

20170308_140511
Castle Garden

20170308_135707

20170308_135647
Smithsonian Castle

44114

Germany: KD Rhine River Cruising for 10 Euro a Day

While exploring Germany, my friend and I hopped from one village to the next on a scenic Rhine River cruise for only 10 euro.  This River Cruise could really be utilized for a good 2-3 days, exploring castles and roaming each riverside village. In this blog I’ll explain why the KD Rhine River cruise is something that should be experienced while staying in  Western Germany.

20170509_131416

20170509_132356

What is KD Cruises?

KD is a company that runs several cruising boats that float up and down the Rhine River all day long. The cruise ticket, found at the ticket booth near the river in each village, is only 10 euro and includes access to every KD  boat on the river for one whole day. For example, a boat makes several stops at different villages throughout the day. You can get off of one boat, explore the village, and board another KD cruise to get back to your hotel. This cruise sells food and drink,which is most likely the only way that they make a profit. We just enjoyed the cheap ride. This cruise has an audio system that is your own personal tour guide, explaining the history behind each castle that you pass. My favorite history lesson was about the famous Lorelei cliff- known for its mythical sirens supposedly enticed sailors with their beauty and caused numerous shipwrecks.

20170509_123058
The Lorelei

Why is KD Such a Good Deal?

Well, let me tell you! I’m not sponsored by them, I just thought this was an awesome experience. KD cruising is easy, relaxing, educational, and cheap. A train ticket to the next village along the Rhine would be about 10 euro, but it wouldn’t be near as fun as cruising! We took all our belongings from our hotel in Boppard, Germany and used the cruise to get to our next stay in Bacharach. While that’s one way to do it, booking a stay for one day in each village, you could also take the cruise a few days in a row, exploring different villages during the day, and taking the cruise back to your hotel in the evening. While many villages are similar along the Rhine, they each have distinct characteristics that are fun to experience. First, each village has its own elaborate church, no two are the same. Second, unique castles tower over several villages, creating the fairy tale reputation that the Rhine River is so famous for. In Boppard, ancient Roman and Medieval walls still stand throughout the town. And in Bacharach, old castle ruins sit at the peak of a hill and have been recreated into a youth hostel with incredible views. When we climbed to the castle, a middle school group was staying at the hostel for a historical and fun field trip.

The beautiful, quiet villages along the Rhine River are worth visiting for the castles alone, but add the beautiful scenic views and a sunny boat ride, and you have an unforgettable  German vacation.

Boppard, Germany:

20170508_18362920170508_16532620170508_18593020170508_110411

20170509_102652
Our Hotel

Bacharach, Germany:

20170509_14174320170509_142543

20170509_143751
Bacharach Hostel- Stahleck Castle

20170509_150645

Lovely Travels,

Katie

3 Days Exploring Paris – Total Cost & Itinerary

3-Day Paris Itinerary:

Day 1: Monmarte, Sacre Ceour, Café Le Consulat, Eiffle Tower, & Arc de Triomphe

Day 2: Louvre, Lunch in La Marais, Galeries Lafayette, Laduree Macarons, Rue Montorgueil Market Street, & Train Railroad Park (Pramenade Plantee) Picnic

Day 3: La Chappelle, Notre Dame, Museum D’Orsay, Latin Quarter

We stayed in an apartment that we booked through Airbnb.com

Here is my link to get $40 off your very first stay with Airbnb: Katie’s $40 discount

20170516_205804

On our tour of Western Europe, my friends and I spent three days in Paris, exploring as much of the city as we could. Surprisingly, we got several highlights of this magical city done in a small amount of time- I’ll explain how in this blog. The best part about Paris is the Metro, which will get you anywhere in no time at all. We didn’t get a metro pass for this short trip, but chose to just buy about twenty tickets at a time and split the cost. Our days in Paris were May 16-May 18, 2017. This was still pre-tourist season, but it was getting busier as summer was quickly approaching.

Here is a recap of our Paris adventure, followed by suggestions and total costs of each day:

Day 1:

Monmarte, Sacre Ceour, Café Le Consulat, Eiffle Tower, & Arc de Triomphe

Our starting point to Paris was in Mons, Belgium, where my friend’s family lives. We picked up our friend from the Brussels airport on May 14th and headed to the Mons train station at 7:20 am on May 16th. We bought our train tickets about 2 months before our trip to Paris because prices were quickly rising. We took the high-speed Thalys train, made a few connections, and arrived in the Paris-Nord train station around lunch-time.

The train station is about 10-15 minutes from Monmarte, a very scenic area, famous for its beautiful Sacre Ceour church and artists. We locked our belongings in a giant locker at the train station and took a bus to Monmarte. This was the only time we would be close to Monmarte as it is further away from the heart of Paris. The bus dropped us off at the bottom of the lengthy stairs, which led to the incredible Sacre Ceour church. At the top, we could see the entire city as well as the beautiful inside of this enormous church. Surrounding this church are multiple artists who paint their favorite views of their beloved city. Paintings ranged from 20 euro to hundreds, and they were well worth every penny. I just did not have it in my budget to buy one though I really did want to take them all home with me. Next, we had lunch at the famous café, Le Consulat, which is the most photographed and posted café in all of Paris. We had omelets and tap water. Thankfully, Paris will serve you tap water for free, unlike any other place that we visited in Germany or the Netherlands. After lunch, we took a bus back to the station, retrieved our belongings from the lockers, and took the metro to our Airbnb apartment.

Our Airbnb in Paris was not as great as all the other ones we stayed in throughout this trip. We made it to the entrance of the apartment, but it was locked with a key pad. We checked the rule book on our Airbnb booking online and could not find the code so we were locked out. When we called the host she said, “The code is online,” and hung up! Luckily, another apartment resident arrived and let us in. I looked just now, and this apartment is no longer available on Airbnb, so that’s good. This was the only bad experience we had out of our 6 Airbnb stays during our Europe travels. I still think Airbnb is the best way to travel affordably, just read all the reviews before booking. Once we retrieved the passcode, we got our key, dropped our stuff off, and headed to the Eiffel Tower.

20170516_203920

Just a few left turns took us to the Metro, which got us to the most famous street in the world in just a few minutes. Packed with locals and tourist alike, Avenue des Champs-Élysées runs between the Place de la Concorde and the Place Charles de Gaulle and is home to the famous Arch de Triomphe. Guards and rails blocked underneath this massive structure as a ceremony was being conducted at the time. However, there were plenty of available spots for great pictures. We continued down the street, seeing the beautiful architecture of uniform buildings with iron terraces. The famous bridge, covered in gold statues and carvings was incredibly busy. We decided to enjoy it from afar and make our way to the Eiffel Tower. This large structure that is the epitome of Paris beauty is far bigger than I ever imagined and is just as romantic as I pictured it to be. Vendors selling roses stopped couples nearby, convincing men to buy the love of their life a red flower to express their feelings. The Chainsmoker’s recent single, Paris, was literally playing everywhere, and cheap key chains and souvenirs were laid out, begging for tourists to pick them up. We splurged this evening and ate at a nice restaurant as nothing is cheap around the Eiffel Tower. Unfortunately, I got sick off of seared tuna steak and we had to turn in before night-time approached and the tower lights lit up the sky.

20170516_185832

Total Cost of Day 1:

Train to Paris- $60, Metro 5 euro, Dinner 20 euro, Post Card .20 euro, Airbnb Stay: 50 euro. Total: 135.20 euro = $161.69

Day 2:

Louvre, Lunch in La Marais, Galeries Lafayette, Laduree Macarons, Rue Montorgueil Market Street, & Train Railroad Park (Pramenade Plantee) Picnic

I felt much better the next day, which was good because we had no time to spare. After eating a quick breakfast of boiled eggs and yogurt, which we grabbed the day before in a grocery store, we headed off for more adventures in Paris. This day was filled with admiring famous paintings, window shopping, and lots of eating! We left about 8 am to beat the crowd to the Louvre. Only waiting about 30 minutes in line, we spent about 2 hours in a museum that could take weeks to completely accomplish. Da Vinci’s Mona Lisa resides inside this massive structure, but don’t have high hopes. I found all the other paintings much more beautiful. Why she is so famous is still beside me.

20170517_115415

After exiting the museum, we enjoyed the view as we strolled the sidewalk that was lining the Seine River. Unfortunately, the bridge that was once famous for its love locks had been stripped of the massive amount of metal that had been weighing it down. A few locks remained on the light posts, but the bridge was mostly bare. My favorite part of this walk was the green boxes atop the river guard walls, which looked like nothing early in the morning while they were closed. However, when their owners came to open them, the boxes proved to be filled with old French novels, souvenirs, and paintings of the city. For lunch, we headed to Le Marais, which is located in the 3rd and 4th arrondissements of Paris, consisting of lovely cafés and secret passages that open up into gorgeous boutiques. We went inside Galerie Vivienne.

20170517_162319

Next we headed to the part of Paris that was way out of our league, but we didn’t care. The first stop was at Galeries Lafayette- the very first department store ever built. Filled with Gucci, Prada, and 300 euro sundresses, we breezed through each level admiring the exquisiteness of it all. The real reason we came to this store was for the view. Galeries Lafayette has a terrace at the very top that displayed the most spectacular view of Paris, including the Eiffel Tower, Notre Dame, and the Palais Garnier.

The department store was surrounded by other high end shops so we window shopped until we reached the famous Laduree macarons. Some visitors bought dozens of flavors, but we each just bought one each as we were still full from lunch. Heads up, the salted caramel macaroon is a great choice! We got some chuckles from the employees as we took several pictures in the adorable shop, but hey, it was our first time in Paris!

Next on the list was to buy some food for a picnic that evening. We took the Metro to Rue Montorgueil Market Street, where bakeries, cheese and wine shops, and rotisseries line the streets and fill it with mouth-watering aromas. We each grabbed the dinner of our choice and took the Metro again to Promenade Plantee, an old railroad bridge that has been transformed into a park. I had never seen anything like this. We climbed up the stairs and entered into a narrow pathway surrounded by trees and flowers with benches for stopping to enjoy the nature.

20170517_190232

Our last stop for the day was the famous Rue Cremenieux. Each house on this street is painted a different, pastel color. No one knows why, but the residents have maintained this tradition, making this neighborhood a fun little walk to enjoy when sightseeing nearby.

20170517_191759

Total Cost of Day 2:

Metro- 5 euro, Café- 13 euro, Louvre (student discount) – 13 euro, dinner- 15 euro, Airbnb stay– 50 euro. Total: 99 euro= $118.85

Day 3:

La Chappelle, Notre Dame, Museum D’Orsay, Latin Quarter

We left at 9:15 on our last day and walked to Saint Chappelle, the famous church. The stained glass windows were very ornate, but other than that it was not really worth 11 euro. The Sacre Ceour and all the other churches in Germany and the Netherlands were way more impressive and free. I don’t regret seeing it as it was beautiful, I just wouldn’t go again. However, I could have marveled at the Notre Dame all day long, and it was free. The detail in every inch of its architecture explains vividly why the Notre Dame took 200 years to complete. A story unfolds in the carvings that completely cover the solid stone walls of this church. On the inside, a herd of people uniformly circled around the outside of the pews, reading the history behind such a masterpiece as a choir was beautifully singing American hymns.

20170518_105055

For lunch, we walked to the lively Latin Quarter, which is filled with cheap, delicious food and souvenirs. Crêperie Chez Suzette on Rue de Huchette caught our attention as it served savory crepes that were perfect for lunch or dinner, and were only 5 euro if ordered to-go at the window. I got one filled with Mozzarella cheese, mushrooms, onions, and red bell pepper… best thing I’ve ever eaten in my life, no lie. We crossed the street and got the cutest gelato dessert at Amorino. The server sculpted my frozen treat into a rose on top of a small cone.

20170518_125804

Down the street was the famous, Museum D’Orsay, where we got through the line fairly quickly and received a student discount of 2 euro off our ticket. Though the Louvre displayed all types of art, this museum contained mostly paintings, but they were amazing. At the top of this museum was a giant clock that was perfect for silhouette pictures so be sure not to miss it.

That evening, we headed back to the Latin Quarter to eat a cheap dinner and grab souvenirs. I’m a coffee addict so, of course, I NEEDED a Paris mug and my friend got her sister a book from a small bookstore that would be every bookworm’s dream come true. Shakespeare & Co. is a small store with books that reach up to the ceiling. Outside, there was a guitarist playing and singing for visitor’s enjoyment, and tips.

Our last day in Paris ended with a light rain just as we finished walking back to our apartment. We opened the window, brewed some coffee, and relaxed to the pitter-patter of the rain as we prepared for a train ride to Germany the next morning.

Total Cost of Day 3:

Sainte-Chappelle- 11 euro, Museum D’Orsay- 9 euro, Souvenirs- 9 euro, Lunch- 6.50 euro, Gelato- 3.90 euro, Dinner- 5.50 euro, Airbnb Stay– 50 euro. Total- 84.90 euro= $101.92

Paris can be done in 3 days; however, if you want to enjoy everything that this magical city has to offer, I recommend staying at least a week.

I hope this detailed itinerary of my trip to this breathtaking city has given you the sense of urgency to visit Paris yourself. I promise you won’t regret it!

Lovely Travels,

Katie

Go to my Products & Discounts Page to see the things I bought for my trip to Europe.

Middle Georgia: The Perfect Place for Christmas Lights

Main Street Light Extravaganza

While celebrating one of my friend’s return from Study Abroad yesterday, I had the best experience in downtown Macon, GA at the Main Street Light Extravaganza!

Macon Georgia’s Poplar Street has become the talk of the town for an event that just began this Christmas and hopefully becomes an annual tradition. The entire street is filled with lights that climb all the way to treetops. These lights are synchronized to music performed by the local Macon Pops who sing classic holiday tunes all night long. This light show plays three times a night, at 6:00, 7:00, and 8:00pm and the lights stay on until 11:00pm. Find a spot along the road or, on a busy Saturday night, drive around until a spot frees up like we did. Get out to walk down the grass median that has turned into a winter wonderland for the holidays.

Yesterday, the extravaganza was packed! If you want a lively atmosphere filled with all ages, see the lights on the weekend. However, if you want less crowds and a shorter wait at the Rookery (the best burgers in town), go on a weeknight. The wait at the Rookery was 45 minutes last night, so we drove to The Brick, which serves huge slices of delicious pizza. The best thing about the new light extravaganza is that we no longer have to drive 2 plus hours to get in the Christmas spirit. Before the Macon lights, middle Georgians had to make a day trip to either Lake Lanier, Callaway Gardens, or the Atlanta Botanical Gardens. Now, these three places have incredible light displays, but they are quite a trek and can be very costly. The Macon lights are something that we can drive to at night and enjoy for free, leaving enough room in the budget to enjoy all of the delicious treats downtown.

Located on Poplar Street as well, with a green awning over the glass-door entrance, is a cozy coffee shop, Taste and See, with drinks and pastries. I saw several visitors stop by and grab a hot cocoa before they walked through the lights across the street. Some of my favorite restaurants around the lights are the Rookery, El Camino, and Ocmulgee Brewpub, which are all within a few blocks of the lights, but some may be better to move your car closer to rather than walk. My favorite burger I’ve ever had was at the Rookery where I ate the Allman Burger, but the Taco Salad at El Camino is good too if you’re craving Mexican Food. They also do $2 Taco Tuesdays. The Ocmulgee Brewpub has yummy truffle fries, burgers, and Buffalo Chicken Salad, which is an appetizer, but is plenty large enough to serve as a main course.

Pate Road Christmas Drive Through Lights

If you have time, don’t just stop at the lights downtown, but continue north for a few more miles to see the lights that are giving other houses a run for their money. 1403 Pate Road – Juliette, Georgia puts on a light display like no other house in middle Georgia. On the weekends, people will line their cars up for an hour just to wait to drive through this beautiful presentation of Christmas spirit. Thanks to a sweet family who wants to spread Christmas joy, people from all over Middle Georgia are posting their experiences on Facebook and Instagram, sharing how much they enjoyed the Christmas lights on Pate Road. I have not visited these lights yet, but have made plans to go and have heard wonderful things about them from friends. One of my friends has gone to the light shows 3 times in a row!

I’m just so excited that middle Georgia finally has a perfect place to celebrate Christmas time with friends and family, in fact, we have 2 places! Take a day trip to Macon, GA and see what the entire city is proud to show off thanks to local Christmas cheer and talent. I hope to see you there!

Lovely Travels,

Katie

20171216_194836

 

4 Bucket List Cities in Europe

Just before the rush of tourist season, Europe’s crisp spring breeze begs for an afternoon espresso while touring its finest sights. Here are some places that stood out as my favorite stays this past May when travelling across Europe. In my opinion, all of these cities are bucket list quality, each having their own unique look and activities.

Bacharach, Germany

Altes Haus

This quaint little town, situated along the Rhine River, is filled with rich history. An old, large post office hides tucked away in the back near the church, now serving delicious cuisine to its outdoor guests seated underneath cozy overhead heat lamps. Half-timbered houses adorn the sides of the cobblestone streets, some serving their local wines while others still housing families. After school, children flood the restaurants enjoying soda and snacks after a long day of learning. The nicest elderly lady ever known opens up her centrally-located home to weary travelers of all kinds as she runs an incomparable Bed n’ Breakfast. At the top of this fairy tale sits medieval castle ruins that have been recreated into a youth hostel with an envious view.

Things to do (recommend 1-2 days):

Altes Haus for delicious white wine and apple strudel// Stahleck Castle Hostel// Wernerkapelle Church ruins built in 1287// 200 year old post office (posthof)// Well-preserved town wall and tower (best seen at castle)// KD Rhine Day Cruise// Haus Irmgard Orth (BnB we stayed in).

Paris, France

20170516_125012
Monmarte

The views, the music, the arts, and the romance combine to make this city as fabulous as everyone claims it to be. Seated below the Monmarte Sacre Ceour are artists of every kind expressing their love for their home with each brush stroke. Tall buildings with ironwork and matching stone make for a uniform, yet dreamy style throughout the entire city. The Eiffel tower is surrounded by lovers, giving a red rose to their significant other in exchange for a kiss under the magnificent structure. The largest museum in the world is at the end of a bridge famous for its “love locks.” Many lock their initials to Pont des Arts Bridge and thrown away the key, symbolizing their love for Paris and for another. Along the streets outside the Louvre are curious green boxes that seem like nothing when closed. However, when their contents are unlocked, the boxes showcase paintings, old French novels, and trinkets that grab the eyes of every passerby. A lively area, the Latin Quarter, is filled with souvenir shops, tourists, and an enormous amount of food. The most divine crepes are sold in this quarter for the small price of 5 euro from the window. Savory and sweet aromas flood the streets and invite people to stop for a taste. On the other side of the street is the famous gelato shop, which makes beautiful flower designs out of a decadent frozen treat. The beautiful architecture throughout this city is incomparable, especially the Notre Dame. With cafes and bakeries at every corner, sitting with a coffee and admiring the view is just as amusing as traipsing through every tourist must-see. Around many of the city’s landmarks, tour guides tell interesting stories that explain the significance behind the building. This city steals the heart of many who choose to replace their goodbyes with, “until next time.”

Things to do (recommend as long as you can stay): Eiffel Tower// Notre Dame// Le Bon Marche (1st Dpt. Store)// The Louvre// Musée d’Orsay// Latin Quarter food// Love Locks// Green Box shopping// Palais Garnier performances// Saint Chapelle// Sacre-Coeur// Grand Palais// Place de l’Hôtel de Ville// Lauduree (macaron specialist)// Find elegant wedding and ball gowns for cheap near Gare Du Nord train station on Blvd. de Rochechouart// We stayed in an Airbnb in a great location

Brugge, Belgium

20170523_204006

The quiet town of Brugge seems like it came right out of a storybook. Different colored, connected brick houses show off their various eves and architecture. This city is known to be frozen in time as it was built up in the 1500s with wealth from its lace industry and has remained dormant ever since. Though now a popular tourist town, the city still remains quite peaceful, allowing the chimes of the Belfry to be heard from blocks away. The scents of Belgian fries and famous, home-made chocolates fill the streets, inviting pedestrians to stop for a taste. Ivy covered houses hanging on the edge of canals create gorgeous scenes and backdrops for pictures. A steep climb to the top of the Belfry is challenging, but rewards every climber with an incomparable view of the beautiful city below.

Things to do (recommend 1-2 days): Climb the Belfry// St. Salvator’s Cathedral// The Old Chocolate House hot chocolate// Historium Bruges// Provinciaal Hof// Loppem Castle// The Markt (the square)// Church of Our Lady// Basilica of the Holy Blood// Homemade chocolate stores// Famous Belgian fries in front of the Belfry// Groenerei Canal// Several museums that I did not experience (beer, lace, chocolate)// We stayed in an Airbnb

Haarlem, Netherlands

20170512_172221

Often described as a “mini-Amsterdam,” Haarlem has the lively activities and architecture of Amsterdam, but is much smaller and easier to get around by foot. The Grote Markt in the center of town is filled with visitors and locals alike who grab a drink, take a seat, and people watch the day away. To the right of the Markt towers a massive cathedral that is impressive both in size and design. The cobblestone road, Grote Houtstraat, makes shoppers’ dreams come true, offering every type of store imaginable with some stores like H & M reappearing two and three times. On Mondays and Saturdays, locals set up a supply of food trucks, tulips, clothes, shoes, and other goodies that fill up the entire square, catching the eyes of visitors and filling their noses with delicious aromas. This market offers what the regular shops offer, but for 5 to 10 euros less. Tucked away, but not forgotten, is the historic house of Corrie ten Boom, where tourists line up to see the Jewish hiding place during World War II. Her life is dignified throughout the tour of her home. Her faith in God is believed to be the very reason she lived the life that she did, helping the poor and protecting the weak.

Things to do (recommend 3-5 days): Shop until you drop// Ten Boom tour (available in English)// Tour by foot (tour map and explanations at visitor’s centers)// St. Bavokerk Church (Mozart played on the organ)// Molen de Adriaan Windmill// Bike the city// Eat and people watch at one of the many restaurants in the Grote Markt// We stayed in an Airbnb.

I hope this helps you while planning your next exploration!

Happy Travels!

-Katie

 

Feliz Navidad! A Christmas in Mexico

This past Winter Break, my boyfriend and I were invited to spend Christmas in Guadalajara, Mexico with our friends and their family for 8 days. The family was so kind, taking us in and treating us as their own. This was a packed trip as we celebrated Christmas, our friends’ wedding, and my 20th birthday! Our friends’ father even took us to the beach a few days. Meeting so many awesome people was by far my favorite part of the trip, but other aspects that I’ll always remember concern the Mexican culture, downtown Gaudalajara, and Melaque Beach.

FB_IMG_1484020653495
Our friends’ beautiful wedding celebration

Mexican Culture:

Unlike Cozumel or Cancun, Guadalajara is more than just a tourist area. We stayed in a “colonia” in Zapopan that was so neat to experience. “Colonia” is the Hispanic equivalent of a neighborhood, but way bigger. There are neighborhood stores, restaurants, and food stands created by the residents. One home would sell bakery goods and another would sell tacos. My favorite food stand sold bionicos, which are fruit desserts that are basically all the good toppings from froyo, minus the froyo. We went there so often that the man knew our order. Although, that could be because we were clearly the only Americans in the colonia- but who knows?

FB_IMG_1484020627055
Neighborhood torta shop and owners

Christmas was celebrated much differently than in my home and was a joy to experience! Aunts, uncles, and cousins lived right down the road so they came over and cooked all Christmas Eve, preparing a feast. That night, we played bingo and opened presents from family members. My favorite part about Christmas in this home was that the family made a huge deal about every present. It made the fun last longer, the person giving the gift feel appreciated, and the person opening the gift feel important. That is something I will use in my home one day with my kids. There may not be one-hundred presents under the tree, but talking up each present can make everyone just as excited.


The city of Guadalajara:

50242

Our friends had twin brothers our age who were so generous to drive us around town and translate. They took us to their favorite pizza, ice cream, and taco shops. They even took us on triple dates with their girlfriends to the markets downtown. I got my niece a handmade bow and myself a woven bag. We went to the biggest market I’ve ever been to. It was actually somewhat of a warehouse, but once inside, the market seemed never ending. It had everything from souvenirs to knock off soccer jerseys and Coach purses. I got a cute mug that says “Recuerdo la Guadalajara Jal.” because I’m a coffee addict. I found a cool article on Forbes that explains the city markets in more detail. As far as food in the city, my favorite meal was tacos because they were delicious and cheap. I’m talking 25 cents a taco! Plain water was not available to order with food. Instead, restaurants offered sodas, horchata, and my favorite, agua fresca. Depending on the restaurant, most places offered a variety of different fruit juice, all of which were referred to as “agua fresca.” My favorite flavor was Jamaica, which is made with hibiscus flower.

Guadalajara is a city with impressive, old churches and buildings. When the Spanish came across the Atlantic, they built spectacular Catholic churches and prayer centers. We toured inside the large stone building, Templo Expiatorio del Santísimo Sacramento,and were in awe at the intricate woodwork that adorned each door. The Guadalajara Cathedral was the focal point of downtown and was impossible to miss. Around the Cathedral was probably the most scenic area. Filled with ironwork benches and a giant city sign, the surroundings were basically screaming for a photo-op.


Melaque Beach:20161228_164304

One weekend, the family decided to go on a three-day vacation to the beach. Little did I know that they were taking us to one of the most gorgeous places I have ever been to! I just remember passing miles and miles of palm trees. I’d never seen so many in my life! I quickly decided that Melaque beach is a hidden gem for people looking for the perfect place to soak up the sun at any time of year. The family told me that several people retire and buy homes in Melaque for two reasons: 1. It’s cheap, and 2. Most people speak English. Melaque, although still a tourist area, was far different from my experience in Cozumel because the shops and restaurants dealt in pesos, at the Mexican price. For example, we ate at a place twice that served quesadillas larger than our heads. With the exchange rate, the quesadillas cost us no more than $5, including drinks.

50244 - Copy

Melaque had a lively town center, Plaza Navideña San Patricio, perfect for shopping, eating, and enjoying a night on the town. Market tents were set up with interesting merchandise and, for Christmas, there was a huge Christmas tree and Nativity scene.

20161227_225411.jpg

The Pacific Ocean water was perfect, even in December. The warm sun and beach breeze combined to make the winter in Mexico feel like July in the states. The next day, we drove to the beach at Hotel Boca de Iguanas. This was my favorite area as it was less crowded and had a cliff with a beautiful view at the top. The pool was cold, but still bearable. There were both tourists and locals at the beaches in Melaque, creating both a new yet comfortable atmosphere at the same time.

As I was writing this blog, I began to reminisce on what an amazing experience Mexico truly was. The family we stayed with was the sweetest, most loving group of people that I’ve ever met and they became lifelong friends of mine. I also started thinking about going back to Melaque this Christmas to enjoy its natural beauty once again. I started browsing and found that Airbnb had some great homes to rent for a Christmas vacation to Boca de Iguanas. Here is my link if you would like to check out the beachfront homes they offer in this area. Melaque and Boca de Iguanas were two beaches that I’ll never forget and I can’t wait to step foot on that warm sand once again!