Best Coffee Shops in Savannah, GA

1. Foxy Loxy Print Gallery & Cafés

LRM_EXPORT_4271987211493_20181104_203637130

If you’re looking for a great time with friends or even with the community, Foxy is your place. Each week, Foxy offers a great environment and fun activities. Some of the best nights are Fire & Wine, every Saturday night, and “Movies in the Courtyard” every third Friday of the month. Other entertainment held weekly at Foxy includes acoustic night, poetry slams, and knitting/stitching/crocheting. Try to visit Monday-Friday from 5pm-8pm to take advantage of their $2 lattes and Lone Stars. The best thing about Foxy is that it stays open later than most coffee shops around town. My favorite combo is a latte with a cookie dough brownie!

2. Mirabelle Café & Suites

aligned

If you’re looking for beautiful Savannah scenery, Mirabelle is magical. Grab a seat outdoors, in front of the café, and watch the horse carriages and Olde Savannah Trolleys stroll by the magnificent Cathedral of St. John the Baptist. Mirabelle’s prides itself in authentic Liege Belgian waffles, while offering a sweet twist to the tradition called the “Georgia Peach.” They also offer sandwiches, Panini, salads, and pastries, but I’ve only tried their coffee and waffles, which I give two thumbs up!

LRM_EXPORT_361122126838641_20190228_120359370

3. Savannah Coffee Roasters

20190406_1812435177608921217927486.jpg

Savannah Coffee Roasters is ideal for so many reasons. It’s spacious for big groups, it offers gluten-free dessert options, and its seating arrangements are great for studying. As far as entertainment, Savannah Coffee Roasters has tons of board games that you can check out and play with friends from 4pm to close. They also offer chess tournaments, improv theatre, and high tea.

4. Shuga Girl Sweet House

LRM_EXPORT_285595964261878_20190525_235822284 (1)

Fairly new to the area, Shuga Girl’s is all over Instagram, and for good reason! This coffee and sweets shop is beautiful inside with blush pinks, golds, and a nice 20’s vibe. Their coffee is one of the best that I’ve tried in the area. It’s not as dark of a roast and requires less cream and sugar. They also have crepes and pastries that are sure to couple nicely with your hot or iced coffee.

5. Bitty & Beau’s Coffee

IMG_20190112_145203_391

If you want an atmosphere that brings joy to your heart, Bitty & Beau’s is the place for you. This coffee shop is completely staffed by employees who have intellectual and developmental disabilities. Their tagline is “Not broken,” which proves 100% true once you meet these amazing baristas. Although it looks small from the front, the shop actually goes pretty far back, offering plenty of seating. It is located right behind city market, making it a great location for a little break between sightseeing. One helpful suggestion that I have is to ensure you bring your credit card. So the baristas can focus on customer service and coffee brewing, this shop only accepts card payments.

IMG_20190112_144624_188

6. Way Station Coffee Co.

IMG_20190122_150620_567

Way Station is about 20 minutes from downtown Savannah in a suburb called Richmond Hill. This little shop made it to the coffee list because it actually has, in my opinion, the best tasting coffee along with Shuga Girl’s. The atmosphere is spacious, light and airy, which is perfect for studying or visiting with friends. They often have fun events geared toward children or supporting local businesses. So before you go, check their Facebook page to see if they are offering anything that day.

I’ve made a printout of my favorite coffee shops that I hope is helpful for your Savannah travels. Click here for the printable PDF or just screenshot the list below.

Savannah, coffee

Sincerely,

Katie O.

Come to the Georgia National Fair for the Ultimate Southern Experience

Fall rolls around in Georgia, not necessarily because the temperatures have dropped, but because every other billboard says the Georgia National Fair has arrived to Perry, Georgia. Usually the second and third weeks of October is something that every middle Georgian looks forward to. It’s not a question of if they’re going to the fair, but when and how many times. The fair is literally a part off middle Georgia culture. Friends meet at the clock tower, watch incredibly talented performers, ride rides, and eat the greasiest, most delicious food in the world. Some make a game plan, checking show times online to see all the entertainment available. Others go for the rides, buying an armband and screaming their heart out on the beautifully lit roller coasters. This fair is different than any other. I’ve met people from all over the country coming to enjoy this incredible week-long experience. The Georgia National Fair is a one stop shop to experience Georgia culture, Southern charm, and entertainment of every kind.

@jessicamaephotography

Scarecrows of famous characters line the front of a large building that’s filled with locally crafted art created by all ages. From photography and paintings to handmade quilts, these masterpieces depict the very essence of Georgia culture. A photo of an FFA (Future Farmers of America) high schooler spending quality time with his award winning cow warms the heart of everyone who stops to look. Paintings of woodlands with every creature imaginable depict what Georgians value most about their home. It’s eye-opening to discover how much talent is in our neck of the woods.

Jessica Mae Photography
Jessica Mae Photography

Something that’s also pretty cool to experience is Georgia’s emphasis on agriculture, especially at the fairgrounds. An entire warehouse is dedicated to selling, sampling, and promoting locally grown produce and locally raised cattle. This warehouse, called the Georgia Grown building, has honey, barbecue sauce, roasted pecans, and many other delicious treats grown right in our hometown. Free recipe books are handed out to let the public know all that they can cook with Georgia’s farm-fresh food. One of the best desserts available at the Georgia National Fair is, of course, the piping hot peach cobbler with melting vanilla ice cream on top.

2Edit(1of69)
Jessica Mae Photography

“Thank you, ma’am.” “Howdy, sir.” Georgia is still a place where everyone is expected to address someone older with the utmost respect. While we may only be joking when using the word, “howdy,” listen closely and you’ll hear the southern slang that makes Georgia so intriguing. Another taste of Southern living can be found in our music happening daily at the fair. The wonderful performers, mostly singing country music, get people up and dancing in their boots. Many emerging artists come and show off their newly discovered talent every night while a major music star will have a large concert the Friday before the fair leaves town. My first concert ever was at the Georgia National Fair when the Jonas Brothers came to town (still sad they are no longer a band.) This year, people flooded the fair grounds to see the talented Trace Adkins rock the stage.

@jessicamaephotography

So plan a trip to see the Georgia National Fair in Perry, Georgia this year. Mark your calendar for mid to late October and enjoy some sugar roasted pecans, boot-stomping rhythms, and a good Southern time. Stay until 10:00 pm to end the perfect day with fireworks over the lake. See this nostalgic, beloved place light up one last time before it turns in for the night and rests for the next day.

Jessica Mae Photography
Jessica Mae Photography

Where to stay:

There are many Airbnbs around Perry, Georgia, which is usually the first website that I check for stays. If you find one you like, here is my link to get $40 off your first Airbnb: Katie’s Airbnb Discount
However, we do have several hotels in Perry like Comfort Inn and Suites, Best Western, and Microtel Inn & Suites by Wyndham Perry that will be perfect for spending a few days at the fair. Although there are several Perry hotels with 4+ stars on Google, if they are booked, check out the nearby town of Warner Robins. Stay on Watson Boulevard near the interstate for quick access to I-75 and you’ll get to the fairgrounds in about 25-30 minutes.

Other sites around Perry, Georgia:

Perry’s town square is worth stopping by during your stay. With cute boutiques, pottery painting, and 2 Jerks Soda for dessert, downtown Perry makes for a fun little town to experience. I also recommend a trip to the Oil Lamp, which is highly popular with the locals, for some delicious country-style dinner.

Addresses:

Georgia National Fairgrounds and Agricenter
401 Golden Isles Pkwy, Perry, GA 31069
Oil Lamp
401 General Courtney Hodges Blvd, Perry, GA 31069
Peach Palette Pottery
907 Carroll St, Perry, GA 31069

D.C. in a Day: Walking Guide & Lessons Learned

This past Spring Break, I took advantage of my precious time off from class and hit the road. My family, boyfriend, and I drove to the Historic Triangle in Virginia, consisting of Williamsburg, Yorktown, and Jamestown. The most fascinating stories of the first British colonies and the Revolutionary War were told to us by historians at each site. It was interesting to listen to the stories unfold and imagine how they lived during the 1800s. After exploring the primary towns responsible for the formation of America, we decided to do the fully American thing, and drove about 2.5 hours north to Washington D.C.

This post is a compilation of mistakes we made in D.C. as well as some things we really enjoyed. I’ll list the most useful ways of getting around and my favorite parts of our capital. Here’s the map of the walking route we took, which I think covered most of the historic landmarks.

We did not make it to the changing of the guards at the Tomb of the Lost Soldier this trip, but that is definitely worth attending.

The Big Mistake:

The entire day before and even on our way to D.C., we were debating whether to search for a parking spot in D.C. or park at a metro nearby and take it into town. On the way there, I read a blog that recommended the metro so we got off at the next exit, parked our car, and took the metro. HUGE mistake!!!!!! Only one metro was working so they combined the yellow and blue line into one route. We spent about an hour and a half just trying to go what would have taken us 15 minutes by car. I recommend taking the risk of driving into D.C. and finding a parking spot. If you can’t find a metered spot, which can now be paid by credit card and phone, pay $24 for a whole day at the Union Station parking garage. Once there, you can buy a metro card for the buses. Plus, if you do want to tour Georgetown or the cute neighborhoods nearby, you can just go pick up your car and drive there.

The Holocaust Museum:

Our first stop was to the Holocaust Museum because we reserved a slot online the day before for 1pm. If you have a reservation, you avoid the long line that goes all the way out the door. We scooted on by and showed the front desk our tickets that we printed at our hotel and they let us right through. This tour took us about 2 hours, but you could spend so much longer if you weren’t on a time crunch. It is heart wrenching as you walk through each level and experience the lives of the Jewish people who begin as normal citizens and eventually have everything stripped away from them. For children, the first floor has a walk-through story about a Jewish child whose life is turned upside down by the Nazis. Although still very real and very sad, this portion of the museum is less graphic.

Air and Space Museum:

Even though I had toured D.C. before, this was my boyfriend’s first time ever. I wanted him to get the most out of the small amount of time we had in this incredible place. Growing up, he wanted to be an astronaut and then a military pilot, so we chose to tour the Air and Space Museum as it was 3 pm and we could only choose one Smithsonian before they closed. Once again, in every museum you can spend 30 minutes to 5 hours there, depending on how interested you are in the subject matter.

20170308_141714

The United States Capitol:

This is one of my favorite buildings for two reasons: 1.) The architecture and paintings inside are mind-blowing, and 2.) They give tours. I love tours because when stories are told by historians and tour guides who really love the topic, I get really into it and love their enthusiasm. We had a recent grad student lead our tour group who was an excellent speaker, knew his stuff, and even threw in trivia questions for fun. After the tour, we walked to the Library of Congress. It was closed, but we were still able to walk up the steps and admire just how amazing this building really was. I mean, even the door was made of three-foot thick solid wood!

20170308_140025

Dinner at Union Station:

Union Station should be on your list for sight-seeing even if you aren’t taking a train ride or even eating. It is simply beautiful. It’s ceilings reach all-time highs and it doesn’t disappoint when compared to the rest of the architecture in D.C. We ate at the Shake Shack, which serves overpriced burgers and fries. I would probably recommend choosing something else in the food court like Chinese food or Charley’s Philly Cheese Steaks.

20170308_181011

D.C. at Nighttime:

Go see the monuments at night! Lincoln looks even more gigantic then he already is and the White House is beautifully lit for pictures. We walked from the Lincoln Memorial to the Vietnam and Korean War memorials and then to the WWII Memorial. They were all so much more breathtaking when every name on the wall of fallen soldiers was lit up in honor.

44103

Transportation Options:

While clearly I had a bad experience with taking the metro into town, others have had great luck. The parking is free, and the metro card is only about $5 each. If you do decide to use it, hopefully both metro routes will be working properly. If you choose to park in the heart of D.C., go for the Union station parking lot. As far as once you’re in the city, you walk and walk some more! The buses will take you to certain landmarks, but we just walked everywhere. As long as you make a giant loop around the city, it’s not a bad walk especially when the weather is nice. If you have more time to spend, take a car to see the outskirts. I’ve read of the amazing eats and cute neighborhoods that I will definitely go see on my next trip there. I live about 9 hours from D.C. so I’ve never flown in except on a field trip with a tour bus. I think renting a car would be helpful if spending a week in D.C. as you will want to see more outside the district.

Places to Stay:

Option #1 (cheapest):

In the city, places to stay will be pricey. I just looked it up on Booking.com and found several hostels available if you are looking to meet new people. Some hostels even serve breakfast. A 3 night stay was around $150.

Option #2 (Priciest):

Hotels on the outskirts of D.C. near Arlington Cemetery are $100/ night. However, you are paying for convenience if you choose a centralized hotel, which could be well-worth the cost if you are only staying for a few nights.

Option #3 (in between):

For families or groups of 4 or more, there is no beating Airbnb.com. More space for less money allows you to cook your meals, or at least your breakfast, and fit more people into one house or apartment instead of in multiple hotel rooms. I just looked and found several Airbnb stays for around $100/ night in neighborhoods close to the White House or Capitol Hill.

Here is my link for $40 off your first booking with Airbnb: Katie’s $40 Airbnb Discount

I hope these tips are helpful in planning your next trip to the capital of the United States of America!

Lovely Travels,

Katie

If you’d like to support my blog, use this link to search for and buy anything you need from Amazon.com: Katie’s Amazon link

20170308_140511
Castle Garden

20170308_135707

20170308_135647
Smithsonian Castle

44114